SHORT BIO

Here’s how it often goes with Middle Kids.
 
A song will come to Hannah Joy, usually by surprise, sometimes in the dead of night, almost always in private. With the house to herself, the singer-guitarist-songwriter will tinker with it, sketching her verses and loosely framing how they could fit within the music.
 
Then, when she’s gone for the day, bassist Tim Fitz will see what she has done and add his own shape-shifting elements and figure out if they jibe with Joy’s ideas.
 
By the time Harry Day is ready to polish his parts on drums, there’s still room for him to put his stamp on the work.
 
“Even though Tim and I live together, and we’re married, the work flows usually more when the other person is gone,” Joy says. “Yeah, it’s not like we’re in the room together and say, ‘Hey, play that minor chord again, babe,’” Fitz says with a laugh. “We’re more like, ‘Get out! I’ve got some work to do.’”
 
One listen to Lost Friends, Middle Kids critically acclaimed debut record and it’s clear that the rising Australian trio is aligned with each member’s own vision. Its 12 songs veer from brittle blasts of indie rock to elegiac piano ballads to pop anthems destined to ignite stadium singalongs.

Lost Friends saw the band pick up the highly converted triple j ‘J Award’ for Album Of The Year in 2018, alongside a nomination for Best Rock Album at the ARIAs. The album includes the band’s debut single and biggest hit to date, ‘Edge Of Town’, which has amassed over 20 million streams on Spotify. Single ‘Mistake’, with its infectious chorus that could have been lifted straight out of a long-lost Fleetwood Mac album, landed in Triple J’s 2019 Hottest 100 at number 64. The album was launched with a sold-out headline performance at the Sydney Opera House, a rare feat for any band.

Whilst Sydney, Australia is called home, Middle Kids has spent a large part of their time as a band touring internationally with great success. The band have appeared on many U.S. late night television shows including Jimmy Kimmel Live and The Late Late Show with James Corden. They have toured internationally with the likes of Cold War Kids, Bloc Party and appeared at festivals such as The Governors Ball, Lollapalozza, Osheaga Festival and many more.

Surprising many, the band showed no signs of slowing down with the recent release of two brand new singles, ‘Salt Eyes’ and ‘Real Thing’, and the announcement of a new EP due May 2019.  Both singles have been widely supported by key radio stations across the globe and are yet another display of their knack for haunting hooks and lyrical poignancy that ooze irresistible indie rock appeal.


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LONG BIO

Here’s how it often goes with Middle Kids.
 
A song will come to Hannah Joy, usually by surprise, sometimes in the dead of night, almost always in private. With the house to herself, the singer-guitarist-songwriter will tinker with it, sketching her verses and loosely framing how they could fit within the music.
 
Then, when she’s gone for the day, bassist Tim Fitz will see what she has done and add his own shape-shifting elements and figure out if they jibe with Joy’s ideas.
 
By the time Harry Day is ready to polish his parts on drums, there’s still room for him to put his stamp on the work.
 
“Even though Tim and I live together, and we’re married, the work flows usually more when the other person is gone,” Joy says. “Yeah, it’s not like we’re in the room together and say, ‘Hey, play that minor chord again, babe,’” Fitz says with a laugh. “We’re more like, ‘Get out! I’ve got some work to do.’”
 
One listen to Lost Friends, Middle Kids critically acclaimed debut record and it’s clear that the rising Australian trio is aligned with each member’s own vision. Its 12 songs veer from brittle blasts of indie rock to elegiac piano ballads to pop anthems destined to ignite stadium singalongs.

Lost Friends saw the band pick up the highly converted triple j ‘J Award’ for Album Of The Year in 2018, along with being nominated for Best Rock Album at the ARIAs. The album includes the band’s debut single and biggest hit to date, ‘Edge Of Town’, which has amassed over 20 million streams on Spotify. Single ‘Mistake’, with its infectious chorus that could have been lifted straight out of a long-lost Fleetwood Mac album, landed in triple j’s 2019 Hottest 100 at number 64. The album was launched with a sold-out headline performance at the Sydney Opera House, a rare feat for any band.

Whilst Sydney, Australia is called home, Middle Kids has spent a large part of their time as a band touring internationally with great success. The band have appeared on many U.S. late night television shows including Jimmy Kimmel Live and The Late Late Show with James Corden. They have toured internationally with the likes of Cold War Kids, Bloc Party and appeared at festivals such as The Governors Ball, Lollapalozza, Osheaga Festival and many more.

Surprising many, the band showed no signs of slowing down with the recent release of two brand new singles, ‘Salt Eyes’ and ‘Real Thing’, and the announcement of a new EP due May 2019.  Both singles have been widely supported by key radio stations across the globe and are yet another display of their knack for haunting hooks and lyrical poignancy that ooze irresistible indie rock appeal.
Middle Kids’ music is indeed beautiful, and yet it’s also a strange brew of skittering tempos, melodies that suddenly shift from major to minor chords, and rhythmic interludes that set the band apart from its peers. As soon as you think you’ve pegged them, they dart into another direction entirely.
 
But then, Joy, Fitz, and Day have always been musical chameleons with outsized aspirations. Joy has cast her songs in various settings over the years, dabbling in dance pop and chamber folk. Too insecure to pick up a guitar, she was initially convinced that wasn’t cut out for rock. Raised in a family that values intimacy through music, with two grandmothers who were church piano players, Joy is used to singing hymns in four-part harmonies.
 
That’s where she learned how to “lead people in song,” as Fitz puts it, which differs from performing in front of a crowd. Joy engages listeners, her eyes often locking with theirs at performances. There’s nothing contrived about the way she relays her songs in a voice whose depth of emotion is, quite frankly, startling.
 
Fitz took his own circuitous path to the band, having grown up in Papua New Guinea in a village in the jungle, where his parents worked as doctors. Before they uprooted to Australia when he was 10, he didn’t have much experience with electric music. Rhythm, however, was all around him, which partly explains his off-kilter musical ideas that often drop Middle Kids’ songs down quixotic rabbit holes.
 
“Having diverse influences, we’re not always coming from the same point of view, and that’s actually helped our music,” says Day, who studied jazz performance at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. “I think the songs would be different if there was a true rock dog in this band.”
 
When Joy and Fitz met through mutual friends in 2014, she was taken by how “bizarre” (her word) and heartfelt Fitz’s own songs were. And the admiration was mutual.
 
“Hannah’s the only person I know who regularly makes people cry just by singing,” Fitz says. “When she’s singing about something she finds beautiful, there’s still a bit of chaos in there. Her songs will sometimes sound like how the world feels.”
 
When they started to work together on her solo material, the alchemy was immediate – and sort of singular. “Both Tim and I have been such lone rangers in many ways,” Joy says, “so it was exciting to feel like you could find someone else who makes you so much better.”
 
All three members share at least one common thread, though: they know how to craft classic hooks and riffs that tangle up in your brain like taffy and choruses that linger long after the song has faded. And they’ve bonded over a greater sense of what their music should accomplish.
 
“We are obsessive about music, but we don’t see music as the end point. We see it as an amazing force of connection,” Joy says. “We feel like as we are growing as people and becoming more human, that influences the music. We’re really committed to each other as people first, and then the music comes out of that place.
 
“There’s a cool energy in this band,” she concludes, “because we know we couldn’t do this on our own. We’re a part of something pretty special together.”

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Responsible Agents Jackie Nalpant
Marshall Betts

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